Unconditional Teaching

a living manifesto for healthier relationships in education

Category: Mental health

First Aid in Mental Health: 3 things you can do to help your students and colleagues

Jessica Koch | 11 Aug 2020

How can we administer first aid in mental health emergencies if we feel that engaging with people (and often strangers) in distress is putting our own mental well-being at risk?

Mind_over_matter: A project by the English Drama Group

Katharina Pietsch | 28 Jul 2020

Mind_over_matter is a collection of short films produced by Bielefeld University’s English Drama Group that investigate how the censoring and self-censoring of our identity and emotions affect our mental health.

Podcast: The Ph.D. as traumatic experience

Katharina Pietsch | 25 Mar 2020 | 1 comment

In this episode of the Unconditional Teaching Podcast, Tyll and I talk to Jessica about her experience of writing and defending her Ph.D. thesis and the severe strain it put on her mental health.

The discourse of wasted potential – a critique

Jessica Koch | 14 Jan 2020 | 2 comments

The discourse of wasted potential is omnipresent but it may be a harmful way of speaking about ourselves, relating to others, and thinking about our or others' accomplishments.

Radical Acceptance and expectations in teaching

Jessica Koch | 17 Dec 2019

In this piece, I elaborate on how the concepts of Radical Acceptance, the “trust-default”, and the distinction between personal and professional expectations helped me to improve and feel better about my teaching and get a better understanding for what I think unconditionality in teaching should entail.

Speaking to students about self-care and mental health

Tyll Zybura | 28 Oct 2019

Spending thirty minutes of one class session on honest talk about stress and suffering and coping and healing can have an enormous positive impact on our students’ lives.

On ‘embracing mediocrity’

Tyll Zybura | 14 Oct 2019 | 1 comment

Students often have an unhealthy all-or-nothing attitude toward their work which increases stress levels. They relax a bit when they learn to prioritize their work and allow themselves to ‘embrace mediocrity’ on low-stakes tasks to save time and energy.